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Charming Italian Words that I Love

Learning Italian is like music to the ears and every time I read a new word, I fall in love with the Italian language even more! I have been studying the Italian language since 2015 and have had many moments of highs and lows. Over the course of few years, I have understood how much I love Italian words. Since language learning is really for life, the number of words I know maybe only a handful. One cannot become fluent or expert in a few months or years so it is important to keep reading to find new words. Taking this seriously, every day I try and listen to new conversations, words and music. I often think how Italian really is the most beautiful and melodious of all languages. Over the course of these years, I have read and loved many Italian words. Some stayed with me more than the others so here are those very basic yet 11 charming Italian words that I absolutely love and adore

Charming Italian Words I love (with meanings):

1. Allora:

It is one of my favorite words but it is difficult to explain its meaning. It means “well”, “so” or “then”….. Love the way Italians use it ever so often in every sentence.

Examples:

  • allora, divertitevi! (well then have fun!)
  • e allora?? (and so?)
  • bene, allora…andiamo!? (good, so…let’s go?!)

2. Arancione:

this means the color orange. Love the way when I speak it 😉

Examples:

  • Non mi piace l’arancione (I don’t like the orange)
  • C’e` un albero arancione vicino a casa mia (There is an orange tree near my house)
  • La maglietta arancione e` molto bella (the orange teeshirt is very pretty)

3. Prego:

This all purpose word means “welcome”, “come in”, “after you” “not at all”….

Examples:

  • prego, accomodatevi (welcome, make yourselves comfortable)
  • A-Grazie per il caffe`. B- Prego! (A- Thanks for the coffee, B- welcome)

4. Abbiocco:

isn’t this word so beautiful? It means the the drowsiness after eating a big meal.

5. Menefreghismo:

Ha! This word is badass. It means I couldn’t care less! I use this a lot now.

Example:

  • Il tuo menefreghismo mi fa male (your disregard makes me feel bad)
  • Questo menefreghismo non deve accadere (this indifference is not accepted)

Read also-11 Amazing Italian songs to boost your language skills!

6. Magari: 

this is a dreamy word. It means I wish or if only it was true…!

Examples:

  • magari un’altra volta (maybe another time)
  • sara` meglio da prima magari (it will be better than before I wish)
  • magari, fosse cosi` semplice (if only if was so simple)

7. Vattene:

This word is used when you want someone to simply go away!

Examples:

  • vattene e lasciami stare (go away and let me be)
  • ora vattene (now please go)
  • prendi quello che cerchi e vattene (take what you want and go)

8. Chiacchierare:

this word is just like it sounds- chatty and gossipy. 

Example:

  • chiacchieriamo un po’? (let’s chat a bit?)

9. Sbocciare:

Again I love the way it sounds. The word means to bloom 🙂

Example:

  • L’amore ha bisogno di un tempo per sbocciare (love needs time to bloom)

10. Pioggia:

Pioggia is the word for rain, so simply and beautiful.

Example:

  • Un’altra settimana senza pioggia

11.Trasecolare:

It means to be dumbfounded.

What I love about these charming Italian words are they are simple words from everyday conversations. My favorite from the list are allora and magari!! Tell me yours??

Further Reading:

15 Words to know before travel to Italy

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92 Comments

  • […] Charming Italian Words I love […]

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  • […] 11 Charming Italian Words […]

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  • Ten Favorite Books on Italy | Italophilia
    November 1, 2016 at 1:04 am

    […] a long time know that I am learning Italian since more than a year now. I regularly do a series on Charming Italian Words and many words come from this beautifully researched book by Dianne Hales. This isn’t […]

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  • Reading Glasses
    August 13, 2016 at 1:47 pm

    Love how we roll the letters L & R while saying allora! Affascinante 😀

    Reply
    • Ishita
      August 13, 2016 at 1:50 pm

      Me too 😉 Too much fun. Allora……. 😉

      Reply
  • […] and read many words but also loved them. Many of my random favorite words were initially part of this post few months […]

    Reply
  • Eva
    June 16, 2016 at 5:08 pm

    I can almost picture the situation when you learnt “abbiocco” – after a huge lunch. Have I guessed? 😀 Food coma. Oh yes.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 16, 2016 at 5:21 pm

      Haha 🙂 Yes 😛

      Reply
  • Manja Mexi Movie
    April 11, 2016 at 7:55 pm

    You have just taught me at least three new words (for “bloom”, “gossipy”, “dumbfounded”). For some reason I learnt the fastest words for vegetables, such as finocchio=fennel, sedano=celery, fave=broad beans, carciofi=artichokes. But I find myself saying “allora” very very often, somehow it’s stuck on my tongue. And “va bene” too.

    Here is something I wrote about learning Italian:

    https://manjamaksimovic.wordpress.com/2014/03/31/parole/

    Reply
    • Ishita
      April 11, 2016 at 10:38 pm

      Mine too. Allora and prego. I guess you know vegs more since you now live there 🙂

      Reply
    • Karolina Dimitrova
      April 12, 2016 at 12:09 am

      Oh, yes, eccolo! And also tutto qua/qui <3

      Reply
  • Karolina Dimitrova
    April 10, 2016 at 6:51 pm

    Hi! 🙂

    I just found your blog and I am so happy to find other italophiles! I liked the list of words you did, I learned a few new ones, but also found some of my favourites like allora, prego e vattene! I would also add the following words and expressions:

    – incantesimo – means enchantment
    – non me ne frega niente – I couldn’t care less
    – me ne vado – I’m going
    – cara – as a way to address someone. I started using it with my dearest friends after I began to learn italian and had the strong urge to implement it in my life wherever I can 😀
    – non vedo l’ora – I can’t wait

    Reply
    • Ishita
      April 11, 2016 at 10:34 pm

      Thank you Carolina. Sorry to reply late I’m traveling at the moment. Lovely words you chose 🙂 great to meet another italophilie. Yay! Ps- didn’t know the last word 😉

      Reply
      • Karolina Dimitrova
        April 11, 2016 at 11:27 pm

        Hehe, happy to have contributed 🙂 How long have you been studying Italian?

        Reply
        • Ishita
          April 12, 2016 at 12:09 am

          🙂 8 months now

          Reply
  • TheGrazieGirl
    March 19, 2016 at 10:45 pm

    Reblogged this on The * Grazie * Girl * and commented:
    Here’s another wonderful list of Italian words which are good to know when you travel to Italy. One of my personal favorite’s is allora, which seems to be almost on par with the use of like in the United States. Listen for it next time you go. You’ll be surprised at how much you will hear it. Also, congrats to Ishita for another wonderful article on Italophilia.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 21, 2016 at 3:23 pm

      Thank you so much cara. I’m really honored that you liked my blog. We are kindred spirits. Thank you for sharing.

      Reply
  • […] Source: Charming Italian Words that I Love […]

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 18, 2016 at 9:49 am

      Thank you 🙂

      Reply
  • maristravels
    March 16, 2016 at 7:37 pm

    Sorry, two typos in original so have corrected it here. Apologise for taking up space!
    Loved all the words and have learned a few more from your correspondents; lists. I have just too many to mention but foodie ones like arancini, gelato and pomodoro are top of my list. But I think Grazie Tanto has been my favourite since I first read Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Bianca Among the Nightingales ….. Nor heard the Grazie tanto’ bruised To sweetness by her English mouth….
    Perfect.
    Love your blog, will be returning to it.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 16, 2016 at 8:03 pm

      Please don’t apologize 🙂 I love comments from readers. So much fun and keeps you going. Yes grazie tanto is from the heart. lovely language. please keep visiting the blog 🙂

      Reply
  • maristravels
    March 16, 2016 at 7:35 pm

    Loved all the words and have learned a few more from your correspondents; lists. I have just too many to mention but foodie ones like arancini, gelato and pomodoro are top of my list. But I think Grazie Tanto has been my favourite since I first read Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Biana Among the Nightingales ….. Nor heard the `Grazie tanto’ bruised To sweetness by her English mouth….
    Perfect.
    Love your blog, will be returning to it.

    Reply
  • Lora by Lora
    March 11, 2016 at 5:00 pm

    Allora is also my fav word. Bella, and the fact thats Italians call each other Bella is just beautiful. It took me 5 years to get the meaning of “magari”. Magari now I know.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 11, 2016 at 5:14 pm

      I agree, they are so friendly and beautiful 🙂 Haha. Glad you do

      Reply
  • MyBookJacket
    March 7, 2016 at 10:52 pm

    Allora sounds so pretty. I’d name my kid that if I had one. Probably a bad idea but it’s so pretty!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 8, 2016 at 2:24 pm

      It’s a beautiful word and if you hear it from an Italian it’s even more so 😉 don’t name your kid that! 😛

      Reply
  • foodinbooks
    March 7, 2016 at 8:00 pm

    Ciao Bella are two of mine. Love this post!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 7, 2016 at 10:46 pm

      Thank you 🙂

      Reply
  • Un po' di pepe
    March 7, 2016 at 8:35 am

    There are so many parole piacevoli Italiani! It’s even one of my blog categories. Just a few I can think of right now……. Pettegolezzo (gossip) from the root word gola, strofinacci (dishrags) spira polvera (vacuum cleaner), dondolare ( to swing) and pretty much any word starting with a z……zuccheriera, zoccolo, zanzariera, zenzero, zoppicare. Oh I have to stop now😜

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 7, 2016 at 7:47 pm

      You must keep coming by and tell me more. It’s a long list I’m making .. 😉 What do you suggest to do (being in a non Italian environment) to up my use of the language. Don’t speak in it at all 🙁

      Reply
      • Un po' di pepe
        March 7, 2016 at 8:59 pm

        Being in a non-italiano environment makes it hard to increase the vocabulary and make use of it. I think the best thing in that case is to subscribe to RAI and watch lots of Italian TV! Getting together with a few others once a week to speak is also helpful, if you know other would be italiano speakers in your area. I don’t imagine there are hordes of them in India though. In bocca al lupo! Cristina

        Reply
        • Ishita
          March 8, 2016 at 2:23 pm

          True Cristina. You are right. There aren’t many but il try. Grazie mille! 🙂

          Reply
    • Ishita
      March 7, 2016 at 7:47 pm

      I love all the z ones you said plus pottegolezzo!

      Reply
  • Diana Lynn
    March 5, 2016 at 11:43 pm

    These words are great! I like the not one translation words too like magari, prego and allora (just like you). Great list!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 6, 2016 at 3:45 pm

      Thank you Diana 🙂 I hope to keep adding such posts. Baci

      Reply
  • lindaravello
    March 2, 2016 at 7:03 pm

    I have just signed up for an on line Italian course – so hopefully I will have enough words to chose some favourites soon……….
    I do have favourite English words though:-
    Thoroughly
    Hedgerow
    Ravishing
    No reason, just like their sound x

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 2, 2016 at 7:03 pm

      Thanks Linda for your thoughtful comments. I hope you can learn Italian also soon just like many of us are learning out here and then make a favorite list of your own 😀

      Reply
  • Luca Marchiori
    March 2, 2016 at 2:40 pm

    ‘Mi dica la verità per cortesia? Niente farfanteria.’ Love it 🙂

    Reply
  • Luca Marchiori
    March 2, 2016 at 1:32 pm

    I love this post, and thanks for sharing. It’s so hard for me to choose my favourite Italian words since they all sound so beautiful. Here are five of my favourites though:
    1. palloncino – a balloon (the kind kids play with)
    2. ricciolino – means a kid with curly hair (my cousins used to call me this)
    3. tuffarsi – to dive … so onomatopoeic
    4. marangona – Venetian dialect for carpenter, but also the main bell in the Campanile di San Marco. My Venetian dad used to call pavlova this as a joke, because it sounds like it should mean ‘big meringue’.
    5. farfanteria – Sicilian dialect for ‘a tissue of lies’. It makes a horrible thing sound pretty!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 2, 2016 at 2:33 pm

      Wonderful! I need a diary now <3 everything that you have given is so precious. Please keep coming more often

      Reply
    • Ishita
      March 2, 2016 at 2:34 pm

      farfanteria is my fav 😉 Cute about ricciolino

      Reply
      • Luca Marchiori
        March 2, 2016 at 2:35 pm

        I learnt farfanteria from watching Commissario Montalbano! 🙂

        Reply
        • Ishita
          March 2, 2016 at 2:37 pm

          I love that show but cannot recall the word 😛

          Reply
          • Luca Marchiori
            March 2, 2016 at 2:38 pm

            I’m sure you’ll notice it next time. He says it a lot 🙂

            Reply
            • Ishita
              March 2, 2016 at 2:40 pm

              🙂 Will. Where are you from?

              Reply
              • Luca Marchiori
                March 2, 2016 at 2:48 pm

                I’m Venetian but half English. I live in Tuscany. What about you?

              • Ishita
                March 2, 2016 at 2:55 pm

                How wonderful! Lucky you 😀 I am Indian and fell in love with Italy 3 years back 😀

              • Luca Marchiori
                March 2, 2016 at 2:56 pm

                That’s also wonderful! I’ve never been to India but am very attracted by the culture … and food!

              • Ishita
                March 2, 2016 at 2:59 pm

                Food everyone is I guess. You must visit here someday 🙂 Italian and India cultures are so similar.

              • Luca Marchiori
                March 2, 2016 at 3:03 pm

                I have a couple of very good friends who are Indian, but live in the USA. They are such warm people and great friends. I can believe it!

              • Ishita
                March 2, 2016 at 3:16 pm

                Aww <3 won my heart!

  • Passports and Pigtails
    March 2, 2016 at 9:41 am

    I love Grazie Mille. Especially if I just used the word Vino.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 2, 2016 at 11:54 am

      hahaha 😀 good choice!

      Reply
  • Life Happens
    March 1, 2016 at 3:30 am

    “Frutti Di Mare” translates as “Fruits of the sea” or seafood. How beautiful is the Italian language! Thank you for sharing! I’m very new to the Italian language and I’ve fallen in love 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      March 1, 2016 at 10:11 am

      Me too cara. Its just so beautiful, I love frutti di mare <3

      Reply
  • MommySTyledME
    February 29, 2016 at 8:53 pm

    Arancioni. I love this word.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 29, 2016 at 11:27 pm

      😀 it’s such a pretty word. Great choice

      Reply
  • kiki1469
    February 29, 2016 at 1:45 am

    Hi. It’s fun reading everyone’s favorites here. I also like chiacchierare, but it’s doesn’t have that roll-off-the tongue feel that asciugamano does (as someone mentioned). I like that one too.

    One I recently learned is un amazzacaffe – fun to say… and drink – It can be considered the official end to a meal – often grappa, though not my favorite, can also be something like fernet branca or strega, a digestivo.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 29, 2016 at 9:56 am

      Wow, thank you that’s a whole new list of words for me 😀 grazie. love them all, esp asciugamano

      Reply
  • DreamDiscoverItalia.com
    February 27, 2016 at 9:06 pm

    I’d add asciugamano (bath towel) just cos I love the way it sounds and it was one of the first words I learnt!! rest post Ishita!

    Reply
  • Dalila
    February 27, 2016 at 2:11 am

    Such a beautiful blog post 🙂 <3

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 27, 2016 at 9:36 am

      Thank you Dalila 🙂

      Reply
  • livedinitaly
    February 27, 2016 at 1:02 am

    Reblogged this on Livedinitaly's Blog and commented:
    How could one NOT fall in amore with the Italian language? È bellissima!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 27, 2016 at 9:36 am

      So true. Thank you!

      Reply
  • pblevitt
    February 26, 2016 at 10:53 pm

    Ishita, I so enjoyed this post – among my favorites: allora, magari, and vattene.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 27, 2016 at 9:35 am

      Thank you. I’m so happy you did 😀 great choice!

      Reply
  • margieinitaly
    February 26, 2016 at 7:40 pm

    Prego and magari are my faves!!
    Of course also Bellissimo and Meraviglioso !

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 26, 2016 at 8:51 pm

      Margie I hadn’t heard the last one. Grazie

      Reply
  • R.italy
    February 26, 2016 at 7:03 pm

    Che bello!
    I like “arcobaleno” (rainbow) and what about the sound of “ninna nanna”? (Lullaby)
    P.S. Abbiocco is with “o”. It’s very roman! I love it <3

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 26, 2016 at 8:51 pm

      Thank you for stopping by 🙂 correcting. Love both your words too

      Reply
  • Tanja
    February 26, 2016 at 4:20 pm

    dolce, gelato, ciao are mine:)

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 26, 2016 at 4:50 pm

      dolce <3 okay, granted 😉

      Reply
  • travelrat
    February 26, 2016 at 12:26 pm

    I like ‘pomodoro’. if we adopted it, it would avoid all those ‘tomahto/tomayto. arguments. Also liked, when we had dealings with the Italian Air Force in the ‘way back when … ‘mariscallo’ = Warrant Officer

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 26, 2016 at 12:29 pm

      Thanks for the new word 🙂 I like pomodoro too.

      Reply
      • travelrat
        February 26, 2016 at 4:12 pm

        I often wonder if Giacomo Casanova would be as romantic a figure if he’d been an Englishman named Jim Newhouse? 😀

        Reply
        • Ishita
          February 26, 2016 at 4:50 pm

          Hahahha 😀

          Reply
    • Luca Marchiori
      March 2, 2016 at 1:15 pm

      When I was a child I spent a few summers in Piemonte at my uncle’s house. His mother-in-law, a delightful old lady known as la nonna Caterina, lived with him and used to grow all sorts of things in her orto at the back of the house. She spoke Piemontese dialect and used to refer to pomodori as tomatiche! I love both words 🙂

      Reply
      • Ishita
        March 2, 2016 at 1:26 pm

        Thank you for this precious memory <3

        Reply
        • Luca Marchiori
          March 2, 2016 at 1:33 pm

          Thank you for reawakening it!

          Reply
          • Ishita
            March 2, 2016 at 2:32 pm

            <3 Always welcome

            Reply
  • Lyn
    February 26, 2016 at 11:56 am

    Hey Ishita, my favourite word was PREGO until I discovered ALLORA, which is hands down my very favourite. I love the way you have inserted your words into your pictures. You must show me how to do that one day. Lyn

    Reply
    • Ishita
      February 26, 2016 at 11:59 am

      Mine too Lyn 🙂 I love allora and the musical sound with it 😉 Definitely. I will help you do it over email!

      Reply
      • Lyn
        February 26, 2016 at 12:04 pm

        Thanks Ishita

        Reply

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