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More Charming Italian Words that I Love

Learning Italian has been so fun and invigorating. Over the course of time I’ve studied so many beautiful Italian words! Many of my random favorite words were initially part of this post few months ago. Today I have another list for you and also a fix on learning a new language.

  1. Nebbia: fog
  2. Ringraziare: thank/acknowledge
  3. Sforzarsi: The meaning of the word is struggle or endeavour.
  4. Pocchino: small, a tiny bit.
  5. Capolavoro: masterpiece!
  6. Zanzara: mosquito
  7. Meraviglioso: marvelous, striking.
  8. Soprattutto: above all/mostly
  9. Boh: I don’t know/care!
  10. Attraversare: to cross
  11. Tantissimo: very much

PS: Please excuse for any spelling errors in this post.

Have you read the post on Italian Movies??

Further Reading:

The limits of my language are the limits of my world.”

Ludwig Wittgenstein

114 Comments

  • Gemma Bergomi
    August 8, 2016 at 11:49 am

    My favourite word, because it’s so dramatic for a very calm animal, is tartaruga and high means turtle. I rarely get to use it but when I do it’s worth the effort I went to to fit it into a sentence

    Reply
    • Ishita
      August 8, 2016 at 7:39 pm

      Wow thank you. That goes in my list too. Thank you!

      Reply
  • Eleonora - Italian Storytellers
    August 6, 2016 at 2:16 pm

    Do you know what fascinates me about my language? The origin of the words, because they come back to the Roman or Greek language when, I think, the conversations were more basic. Simply amazing!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      August 13, 2016 at 1:44 pm

      Totally agree. Languages are so amazing. And their history is even more so.

      Reply
  • An Englishwoman in Italy
    July 24, 2016 at 10:34 pm

    Lovely choice of words, Ishita. I like “Ci mancherebbe [altro] = Least I could do” (that’s an expression, not a word but I hope still relevant) and “coso=thingummy”

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 25, 2016 at 10:32 am

      Ciao cara. I just read your email, unfortunately no plans of Italy in August but will keep you posted .. Glad you enjoyed! I love coso.

      Reply
    • Eleonora - Italian Storytellers
      August 6, 2016 at 2:17 pm

      ‘Coso’ is very common in central Italy, above all in the region where I live

      Reply
  • Heléna
    July 21, 2016 at 12:23 pm

    My favourite to use is “che animale!” To describe someone – always puts a smile on an Italians face. Other than that, “boh” is probably my most used word (:

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 21, 2016 at 12:42 pm

      Haha, boh is the best one. I like che animale too 😉

      Reply
  • beingastory
    July 14, 2016 at 4:52 pm

    All great words! I quite like the word fiocco (bow,tassel,knot). It’s not particularly useful but I find it cute.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 14, 2016 at 4:58 pm

      Aww that is a cute word. N thank you so much. Glad you enjoyed!

      Reply
  • TrippinBox
    July 7, 2016 at 3:34 pm

    Really nice post. I’m going to whack the idea for French words 😉

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 7, 2016 at 3:44 pm

      Thank you 🙂 That should be fun.!

      Reply
  • Holiday Season
    July 5, 2016 at 1:22 pm

    These are difficult.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 5, 2016 at 3:01 pm

      Yes, the level is upped 😉

      Reply
  • Valorie Grace Hallinan
    July 3, 2016 at 5:36 pm

    I hope you do more posts like this. I would love to improve my Italian, and singling out these beautiful words are such a great way to increase vocabulary. Capolavoro is a new word for me, love it!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 4, 2016 at 10:41 am

      Thank you. I am made this post almost a 2 monthly thing but I thing now I will do it every month..glad you could enjoy and learn 🙂

      Reply
  • sunnydaysinseattle
    July 2, 2016 at 6:45 pm

    The most beautiful language in the world!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 3, 2016 at 5:19 pm

      I couldn’t agree more!

      Reply
  • travelwithemilie
    June 30, 2016 at 4:11 pm

    I love the word zanzara! But no the effects on my body!
    Among my favourite words: francobollo (stamp) and temperamatite (pencil sharpener) 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 30, 2016 at 4:13 pm

      Wow the word for a pencil sharpener is so cute and difficult 😛 yes I don’t like zanzara on me too 😉

      Reply
  • Shikha (whywasteannualleave)
    June 29, 2016 at 4:21 pm

    Nebbia and Zanzara are such beautiful lovely sounding words to describe fog and mosquito – which sound decidedly less exotic in English!!! This is why Italian is such a lovely language 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 29, 2016 at 4:50 pm

      Truly Shikha 🙂 I love it myself when I say zanzara <3

      Reply
  • Divya Deepak Rao
    June 28, 2016 at 9:06 pm

    Thank you so much for stopping by Ishita! Eager to explore your amazing Italian journey:)
    Hugs

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 29, 2016 at 12:17 pm

      Thank you Divya. Hugs back 🙂

      Reply
  • Dustin and Becky
    June 28, 2016 at 7:43 pm

    I love the pictures with the words! I am a visual learner and I totally appreciate the images to associate in my mind! Great post! 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 29, 2016 at 12:18 pm

      Yay so glad you did. I wasn’t sure whether to put but it gets mundane without pictures 🙂

      Reply
  • Alexa Rehm
    June 25, 2016 at 2:24 am

    Ohhhh this brings me back to Italy! Especially zanzare….Florence is rather swamped in zanzare haha. And “pochino, pochino!” The sweet nonna I lived with used to always say that and it was so cute 🙂 Thanks for the post! Italian is the greatest language 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 25, 2016 at 10:24 pm

      Lots of zanzare in India too 😉 haha. Such a sweet memory . Lovely. And I’m loving Italian but it’s hard 🙁

      Reply
      • Alexa Rehm
        June 25, 2016 at 10:40 pm

        It is hard! So beautiful, but so challenging!

        Reply
        • Ishita
          June 27, 2016 at 12:11 pm

          True. Any tips?

          Reply
          • Alexa Rehm
            June 27, 2016 at 7:11 pm

            Just use it as much as possible! See if you can find an Italian to be a conversation partner. They know their language best, after all!

            Reply
            • Ishita
              June 28, 2016 at 9:51 am

              Absolutely. I can’t find an Italian unless on Skype but I will use it as much. grazie!

              Reply
              • Alexa Rehm
                June 28, 2016 at 9:52 am

                Certo! Even a pen pal from Italy would be good! Buona giornata!

              • Ishita
                June 28, 2016 at 9:53 am

                Anche a te cara!

  • Рикардо
    June 24, 2016 at 4:30 pm

    please revise “Soprattuto” with “Soprattutto” (double T twice)
    Italian language is full of consonants! 😀

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 24, 2016 at 5:01 pm

      Thanks so much 🙂

      Reply
  • ID Smith
    June 22, 2016 at 4:39 pm

    This is lovely. Claudio Ranieri, Leicester City’s winning Italian manager, has been charming us in the UK with his philosophy. “They were tears not shed,” he said, on crying when seeing his travelling supporters. And, “If someone is disrespectful to me, and I did nothing wrong, then it’s not my fault”. It seems to be a nation created to defeat anxiety. If only I could live like that all the time here. Thank you. My favourite expressions, Ancora non so, still I don’t know, and Secondo me, of course.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      July 20, 2016 at 2:58 pm

      I love these expressions that you quoted too 🙂 Thank you Smith!

      Reply
    • An Englishwoman in Italy
      July 24, 2016 at 10:31 pm

      Very interested to learn that Secondo me means of course – I always thought it meant “in my opinion”.

      Reply
      • ID Smith
        July 24, 2016 at 11:06 pm

        Yes, ‘in my opinion’. I meant to say, ‘and of course I like secondo me’. ‘Of course’ is ‘certo’. Any idea what ‘poco’ means? I hear it often, and I think it means, ‘see you later’, as in, ‘a little later’.

        Reply
        • An Englishwoman in Italy
          July 25, 2016 at 12:23 am

          That’s a new one on me, no one has said to me “Poco” by itself. I shall listen out for it.

          Reply
          • Ishita
            July 25, 2016 at 10:31 am

            🙂 Thanks a lot cara

            Reply
        • Ishita
          July 25, 2016 at 10:33 am

          I know that poco poco means a little bit 🙂 I love all the words you listed.

          Reply
      • Ishita
        July 25, 2016 at 10:33 am

        I didn’t know that either

        Reply
  • Francesca
    June 22, 2016 at 4:04 am

    I nearly missed this great post Ishita. One day I should do a post of my fave Italian words but in the meantime I offer these- brio – a great word and something I always feel or sense in many Italian cities, and sgrassatore- a degreasing cleaning product that I like because I like to say this word, and decespugliatore elettrico, a brushcutter, because it takes longer to say the word than to do the cutting.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 22, 2016 at 9:55 am

      Glad you found this post to read then 🙂 Wow. I haven’t heard these words. I am so grateful to you. Thank you! Any plans of Italy?

      Reply
      • Francesca
        June 22, 2016 at 9:58 am

        Next year I hope.Three months of staying somewhere.

        Reply
        • Ishita
          June 22, 2016 at 9:59 am

          Please keep me posted on the months? Maybe we can meetup:) Any places you have in mind?

          Reply
    • Ishita
      July 20, 2016 at 2:58 pm

      Something might brew for me in September. Hope we can meet one day! Ciao 🙂

      Reply
  • christie jones
    June 21, 2016 at 10:18 pm

    Bravissima Ishita! My favourite word is gelato:-):-)

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 22, 2016 at 9:56 am

      Grazie Christie ..Its a lovely word 🙂

      Reply
  • Stefania Bufano
    June 21, 2016 at 10:01 pm

    Ahah nice!. In Florence we have: pochino, bellino, piccino, carino… A lot of “ino” 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 22, 2016 at 9:56 am

      I love them all 😀

      Reply
  • MyBookJacket
    June 21, 2016 at 3:07 pm

    Pochino is definitely cute. I’d very much name a cute puppy that if I got one.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 21, 2016 at 3:33 pm

      Haha, so cute 😉 Nice idea.

      Reply
  • kimberlysullivan
    June 21, 2016 at 12:32 pm

    Great post – love when you are learning another language and there are words that make you smile. ‘Boh’ is one of those ridiculously useful words in Italian. I had no idea what it was when I moved here – but it’s used all the time. : ) Bravissima, Ishita!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 21, 2016 at 12:55 pm

      Grazie mille, cara. Boh is great 😉 N yes..I am trying. its not easy to learn Italian. I get confused and am unable to talk with confidence. I can write/read better I think because of the passive learning.. Someday I will be able to speak .. Let’s hope I can.Any suggestions?

      Reply
  • Debra Kolkka
    June 21, 2016 at 10:24 am

    My favourite is mozzafiato…breathtaking.

    Reply
  • Tony
    June 21, 2016 at 10:12 am

    From this list my favorites are pochino and tantissimo. 🙂 Bravo!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 21, 2016 at 10:39 am

      Grazie Tony 🙂

      Reply
  • voguishlychic
    June 21, 2016 at 10:05 am

    I must say I love these posts. Please make them a series,though this one was a tad bit tough 🤗🤗

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 21, 2016 at 10:39 am

      :* thanks babe. I am glad you enjoyed. I think I will make it a monthly series. Thank you Jovita!

      Reply
  • ae da
    June 21, 2016 at 4:59 am

    Oh, what a pleasant surprise when I read your post, Ishita. “Pochino” is a word my grandmother used all the time, and I haven’t heard it in years and years, since she’s been gone. She always used it to indicate a little bit, just a little bit. Thank you for bringing to mind a sweet memory! Love your blog.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 21, 2016 at 10:40 am

      Aww that’s a precious memory. Grandmoms are special 🙂 I am glad I brought a lovely memory for you. Thank you for the appreciation.

      Reply
  • timewithlyme
    June 20, 2016 at 11:35 pm

    I love this idea! Thanks for sharing your learning and helping me learn at the same time! Gracie! 🙂

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 22, 2016 at 9:56 am

      Prego 🙂 I am glad you are learning too.

      Reply
  • pblevitt
    June 20, 2016 at 9:09 pm

    Exceptional list, Grazie!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 22, 2016 at 9:57 am

      Grazie a te 🙂

      Reply
  • Art We Wonderful
    June 20, 2016 at 7:31 pm

    The word from my Italian lessons that always stuck with me was “francobollo”, the word for stamp. I liked its rhythm.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 8:56 pm

      I love it too. Another word to add to my list 🙂

      Reply
  • georgefebish
    June 20, 2016 at 5:03 pm

    Another of my favorites is the pastry sfogliatella. I love the sound of it. I remember it as s-fog- lia-tella lol

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 5:04 pm

      Haha!! Love it too 😀

      Reply
  • stellalucentellc
    June 20, 2016 at 3:27 pm

    One of my favorite words is “allora.” I took my daughter and son to Italy. They did not want to learn Italian before they went. But, finally, after hearing “allora” practically every day, my daughter broke down and asked me what it meant. It is really just a “filler” word people use when they need a moment to stop and think and means “now,” “now then,” “well then, “etc. I though it was funny that of all the words she could have chosen she chose this unimportant word, made important by everyday use.

    Reply
  • Sara
    June 20, 2016 at 3:25 pm

    I love learning how people from other countries sees Italy and us Italians, and it’s so funny to see the words that impressed you! If you have any questions or curiosity about Italy feel free to contact me, it would be a pleasure to help you out 😀
    Bravissima,a presto!

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 3:26 pm

      Grazie mille, cara. I am sure you don’t understand it fully the way we feel attracted to your race and country 🙂 😉 Thank you so much for extending that hand of help. it means a lot. I will bug you 😉

      Reply
      • Sara
        June 20, 2016 at 3:48 pm

        No, i think I can’t actually understand it but I love my language and it makes me feel happy inside to know that foreigner people love it too, even if I know it is very difficult to learn Italian. We have a lot of words and verbs, it’s messy ahah
        I’ll leave you a few “not so used words” that I like a lot:
        – Bislacco: it’s an adjective used to refer to someone “weird”, “funny”.
        -Soffice: it’s an adjective, it means “soft”, “fluffy”. For example a pillow or a peluche.
        – Marasma: it means confusion, mess.

        Reply
        • Ishita
          June 20, 2016 at 4:09 pm

          Such beautiful words, Sara! Thank you. I know it is not easy and I am trying my luck at learning. Where do you stay in Italy? maybe next time we can meet up when I come? PS- I am horrible at speaking the language. better at reading/writing.

          Reply
          • Sara
            June 20, 2016 at 4:18 pm

            I think you are very brave to try! I live in Novara, a city between Milano and Torino. Meeting up would be awesome! Have you planned a journey here in Italy, already?
            Don’t worry, I’m not that good with english and I’m awful at deutch, I completely understand your troubles 😉

            Reply
            • Ishita
              June 20, 2016 at 4:23 pm

              Your english is fantastic. I can feel it! And yes we can both try to converse 😉 I have travelled to Italy a couple of times and already feel like I belong there. Its so beautiful. Haven’t seen Torino yet. Its on my list. I am going to check out Novara.

              Reply
              • Sara
                June 20, 2016 at 5:00 pm

                That’s amazing, Italy will be happy to welcome you anytime you want. Where have you been?? Have you already visited the southern part?
                I prefer Torino to Milano because of the atmosphere, the history, the beautiful palaces… <3 Totally recommanded.

              • Ishita
                June 20, 2016 at 5:05 pm

                Thank you. That means the world. I have been in North and South both. Trieste, Milano, Firenze, Perugia, Siena, Venice, Lecce, Polignano, Modica, Ragusa, Palermo, Roma…!! Check my blog for more 😉 I have heard a lot about Torino and it is high on my list of places to be visited.

              • Sara
                June 20, 2016 at 10:18 pm

                You almost visited more italian cities than me! Ahah! Where are you from??

              • Ishita
                June 22, 2016 at 9:57 am

                Haha!! I am from India 🙂

  • Manja Mexi Movie
    June 20, 2016 at 1:33 pm

    Love the way how you pick the words that you love and lay them out for us. 🙂 And let’s not forget Bah! It’s when you’re rather desperate. But it never lasts. How could it… in this land when everybody wears such a smile, even policemen.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 1:48 pm

      How well put. Love how happy Italians are and stay. And thank you so much 🙂 I hope it makes a good read.

      Reply
  • Tanja
    June 20, 2016 at 1:33 pm

    🙂

    Reply
  • fromdreamtoplan
    June 20, 2016 at 12:35 pm

    I love this post!! Hahaha I always say boh😄

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 12:37 pm

      Haha 😀 I love that word too. How is it different from Beh?

      Reply
      • fromdreamtoplan
        June 20, 2016 at 12:44 pm

        Beh is generally used at the beginning of a sentence where you desagree and it’s like saying “well…”

        Reply
        • Ishita
          June 20, 2016 at 12:44 pm

          Haha I love this language 😀 thanku!

          Reply
          • fromdreamtoplan
            June 20, 2016 at 12:45 pm

            No problem! 🙂 It’s so interesting to read how you notice all this differences, I’m so used to say them that I don’t even think about that they actually sound weird hahaha

            Reply
            • Ishita
              June 20, 2016 at 12:47 pm

              Hahaha, it is a big thing here for me. I have to go deep into every word to see how it is pronounced. I am sure you will feel the same if you learn Hindi and I correct you 😉

              Reply
      • Eleonora - Italian Storytellers
        August 6, 2016 at 2:11 pm

        In some cases you can translate ‘beh’ also with ‘c’mon’. It is similar to ‘allora’. When they both are used as a question.

        Reply
  • bunnytrailing
    June 20, 2016 at 12:33 pm

    I think mine would be cioccolato torta 😛 😀

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 12:37 pm

      Hahah 😀 That is not in the list but thank you PB 😛

      Reply
  • travelrat
    June 20, 2016 at 12:01 pm

    I like ‘pomodoro’. I’ve also picked up a couple of Italian cuss-words, which I sometimes use, because they sound much more expressive than English ones.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 12:11 pm

      Haha that’s worthy of picking 😉 love pomodoro too. thank you for stopping by!

      Reply
  • karenincalabria
    June 20, 2016 at 10:59 am

    I like it when they use “capolavoro” sarcastically to describe a person.

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 11:00 am

      I didn’t know about it. Thank you :);)

      Reply
  • Love Songs In Spanish
    June 20, 2016 at 10:15 am

    Ci mancherebbe… It’s the least I can do. Don’t mention it. etc. Italian is a wonderful language. See my book “Operatic Italian” at http://www.godwinbooks.com

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 10:35 am

      Nice 🙂 Love it . thank you, il have a look!

      Reply
  • eurekabits
    June 20, 2016 at 9:48 am

    zanzara is very onomatopeic also

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 10:37 am

      Absolutely. Love it!

      Reply
  • Lyn
    June 20, 2016 at 9:04 am

    I like pochino and tantissimo. My favourite word is still ALORA

    Reply
    • Ishita
      June 20, 2016 at 10:37 am

      Haha, it is beautiful especially when used by Italians 😉

      Reply
      • Lyn
        June 20, 2016 at 11:15 am

        And. They use it all the time. Almost like singing

        Reply
    • Eleonora - Italian Storytellers
      August 6, 2016 at 2:08 pm

      And you cannot image how is difficult for me to translate this kind of idioms in English. Probably I’ll start to use them in Italian when I write in English. LOL!

      Reply
      • Ishita
        August 13, 2016 at 1:38 pm

        Haha I bet it is. But your english is SUPERB! brava!

        Reply

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